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REVIEW OF THE CRISIS OF RELIGION: By Shelby K. Sherman

April 28, 2011
Shelby Sherman

American veteran Atheist, writer, and Ebon Mussing contributor, Shelby K. Sherman rates The Crisis of Religion by Adebowale Ojowuro — ‘Five-Star’

In his recent review of The Crisis of Religion by Adebowale Ojowuro — posted on Amazon.com — Shelby Sherman echoes his impression of the work thus:

I thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated this wonderful, thoughtful book by Adebowale Ojowuro. The reader, be they atheist, agnostic, skeptic or believer should be impressed by the scholarship, depth, and wordsmithing that the author carefully conveyed to the reader. Adebowale pens eloquently and respectfully the questions that all of us should be asking about organized religion, and the thoroughly disappointing answers. The author shines a bright light on man’s seemingly insatiable gullibility and dissects the holy tenets of the religious writs, exposing them for what they are, damn lies.

This book goes beyond the typical rants that justifiably skewer the failed and ambiguous prophecies, the impossible virgin birth and the failed line genealogy of Christ’s divinity. It goes further than just gleefully pointing out the hundreds of inconsistencies and contradictions in the Bible; it shows a certain passion, an anger and disappointment in the dishonesty of the religious stranglehold that infects the human race. Nowhere is this passion more evident than in the Lamentation for Africa, a heartbreaking but exquisitely accurate indictment of the failure of the Black inhabitants to avoid the trappings of religions foisted upon them.

This fine work should be on every Skeptic’s top shelf; it is a great triumph for Adebowale and certainly recommended reading.

This review is extracted from  Amazon.com

 

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Shelby Sherman permalink
    April 29, 2011 10:53 pm

    Religion is not about truth. Religion relies on indoctrination by fear and intimidation, preying on especially the young, trusting and impressionable for recruitment into the cult. Recruiters use vivid imagery of fire, death and catastrophe to paint a grisly picture of consequences for not embracing the religious cult. Coercion, guilt and peer pressure are used to convince the victim to “join or else”

    Human beings are naturally gullible and have a hard time dealing with their own mortality and the stark truth that their deceased loved ones will never be seen again. Cult recruiters capitalize on this vulnerability by promising rewards for commitment, and commitment ALWAYS means financial commitment. Religious recruiters also bank on the most tragic fact of this con game, i.e. the ignorance and trusting nature of the recruit.

    Religion is no different from any other con game, whether it be Multi-Level- Marketing, Colon Cleansing or a Nigerian 419 scam, they all offer you glorious benefits for a piece of your soul, or more correctly, your wallet.

    Religious scams are timeless as they are tragic, and as long as there is an ample supply of people who are too lazy to do their own thinking, they will continue to flourish.

  2. Andrew Nandip Paul permalink
    April 28, 2011 10:23 am

    this book is for those who are looking for the truth, because the truth cannot be told to them by their religous leaders!

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